placeholder_mobile
Browse Artworks
Spanish masterpieces of the Post-War period
 

Synopsis

Our proposal assembles historic works executed during the pivotal Post-War
period: from 1957 to 1965.

Highlights include Antoni Tàpies’ “Ocre sobre gris-verd” (1959) and "Díptic
negre amb creus" (1988) as well as Manolo Millares’ "Cuadro 84" (1959) which
offer an insight into the ferocity of this generation’s idiom of destruction
and healing. Meanwhile, Antonio Saura’s highly expressive monochrome
painting from 1957, “Saeta”, which was first shown internationally at
Documenta II in Kassel, is complemented by “186B” a richly textured oil and
sand work that belongs to a 1960 series by Luis Feito depicting the combat
between light and shadow and was exhibited at the artist’s 2002
retrospective at the Museo Reina Sofia. These are juxtaposed with Fernando
Zóbel’s lyrical “Péndulo veneciano” (1965) and José Guerrero's luminous
"Black and Yellow" (1959).

These artists were collectively adopted by the Spanish State as part of its
effort to outwardly project its “modernity” and demonstrate to the world
that the political regime of Franco was opening up. Their participation in
biennials and museum shows across Europe and America—including the Venice
Biennale in ‘58, the ’57 São Paulo Art Biennial, and historic shows at MoMA,
the Guggenheim and the Tate Gallery in the early 1960s —during the period
that is the focus of this project, however, spoke powerfully of their
ideological rupture with the regime. Young and liberal, they were artists
who—in keeping with social movements and thinking in the Western world at
that time—sought to express their existential angst and depict the Post-War
reality of life under a regime that had missed the train of democracy.

Each and every artist incorporated in this project for OVR: Miami
Beach is a figure whom the gallery has researched in depth over recent
years. Through careful examination of their oeuvre, establishing contexts
that bear comparison with their international contemporaries, we seek to
demonstrate the extent to which their artistic discourse has stood the test
of time.

How would you like to connect with us?

Visit website

Newsletter

Please add me to your newsletter list.
By clicking the button below, I consent to Art Basel sharing my name and email with the holder of this room for the purpose of receiving communications. Art Basel shall not be held accountable for the storage and use of my data by the room holder.

Contact

I would like to get in touch and leave a message.
More Viewing Rooms