Art Basel Cities Week

‘Hopscotch (Rayuela)’ Catalog

September 6 – 12, 2018

Narcisa Hirsch

A selection of early films

Museo de la Cárcova

Artworks

Marabunta, 1967
Black-and-white and color 16 mm film and sound transferred to video
Duration: 7’55’’

Manzanas (Apples), 1973
Black-and-white and color 16 mm film and sound transferred to video
Duration: 4’29’’

Pink Freud, 1973
Color 16 mm film and sound transferred to video
Duration: 8’52’’

Patagonia, 1976
Color 16 mm film and sound transferred to video
Duration: 18’08’’

Mujeres (Women), 1970-85
Super 8 film and sound transferred to video
Duration: 24’38’’

Testamento y vida interior (Testament and Inner Life), 1967
Super 8 film and sound transferred to video
Duration: 10’38’’

Narcisa Hirsch’s experimental films form an important chapter in the history of the Argentine avant-garde. Exploring female identity, mortality, eroticism, and violence, her work took on the political issues of her day, connecting personal narratives to larger social histories. Hirsch was born in Germany and emigrated to Argentina in the late 1930s. By the 1960s, Hirsch had abandoned her training as a painter to participate in the performances and happenings throughout the 1960s and 1970 in Buenos Aires, originating such legendary actions as Marabunta (1967) and Manzanas (1973), which formed the basis for her first films. ‘Hopscotch (Rayuela)’ presents a selection of her seminal early films from the 1960s through the 1980s, revealing a key chapter in the history of Argentine experimental film and feminist art.

Narcisa Hirsch archive: Daniella Muttis
Cataloguing: Mariana Garriga

Special thanks to Plavicon. Special thanks to Museo de la Cárcova for hosting this ‘Hopscotch (Rayuela)’ work.

Visitor Information

Biography

Born 1928 in Berlin, Germany 
Lives and works in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Well-known in Argentina, but less so internationally, Narcisa Hisrch has worked for decades creating experimental films that depict the body and domestic life as means of feminist critique. Early in her career, her paintings were exhibited at the Lirolay Gallery, one of the most important avant-garde spaces of Buenos Aires during the 1960s. She was affiliated with happenings throughout the ’60s and ’70s in Buenos Aires and collaborated on projects at the Anthology Film Archives and the Millennium Film Workshop in New York. Hirsch became a leading figure of the Latin American structural cinema scene, alongside Marie Luise Alemann, Claudio Caldini, and Horacio Vallereggio, among others. She was recently honored with a retrospective at the Vienna International Film Festival (2012) and the Goethe Institute in Toronto (2013), and her works were presented at Documenta in Athens (2017).